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  #21  
Old 03/02/2004, 10:38 AM
madtvlover Female madtvlover is offline
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I'm not sure if it's me or what but I've noticed that Stephnie can make herself look younger and older. How does she do that?! I read somewhere that she's 35..is that true?? A few episodes on season 7 where the cast says goodnight to the audience, whenever Steph has on pigtails, she looks like she's in her early 20's. To me, she looks alot younger than 35.
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  #22  
Old 03/02/2004, 12:45 PM
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Stephnie is either 34 or 35.

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  #23  
Old 03/02/2004, 1:36 PM
madtvlover Female madtvlover is offline
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Hmmm......so it is true. I bet alot of people think she's younger though!!
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  #24  
Old 03/02/2004, 1:51 PM
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Just checked imdb.com

Stephnie was born in 1968 which makes her 35

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  #25  
Old 03/02/2004, 4:11 PM
madtvlover Female madtvlover is offline
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Still can't believe it...she looks younger!!
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  #26  
Old 03/02/2004, 4:25 PM
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oh wow i thought she was 30

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  #27  
Old 03/02/2004, 7:20 PM
madtvlover Female madtvlover is offline
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Yeah me too.......like 27-30 years old. No older!!
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  #28  
Old 03/03/2004, 8:17 PM
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10 Things You Don't Know About Women

By Stephnie Weir
October 2002, Volume 138, Issue 4
Photograph by Jeff Lipsky


1. Women lust after younger men the same way men lust after younger women. But we don't marry them and let them take all our money.

2. Not all women love to shop. Regardless, we all hate "Shop-a-holic" novelty gifts—T-shirts, memo pads, refrigerator magnets—depicting a crazy-eyed woman engulfed in shopping bags and holding a smoking credit card. (We do, however, get a kick out of refrigerator magnets that say things like HEY, FAT ASS, THE LOVE YOU CRAVE AIN'T IN HERE!)

3. Fast dancing with you is like watching a stray dog trot down the interstate. We pray for a miracle but know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that a horrific tragedy is about to occur. That is why we prefer fast dancing with our lady friends. It has nothing to do with us having secret lesbian desires.

4. One of our greatest irrational fears is that one day, and thousands of dollars in lotions later, we'll find out that Granny from The Beverly Hillbillies religiously used sunscreen all her life.

5. The "psycho ex-girlfriends" from generations past are today referred to as "Mom."

6. Pro-choice women feel a tiny bit bad that you have no voice in the fate of your unborn child. The same way you feel a tiny bit bad that we make only seventy cents for every dollar you earn. Yeah, we plan to do nothing about it, either.

7. Women have only one Halloween costume. It is a slut. You may be thinking, Wait, I've seen women dressed as sexy witches, sexy cats, sexy hoboes. . . . But I assure you they were all dressed as sluts dressed as witches, cats, and hoboes. For us, Halloween is solely an opportunity to wear the whorish clothes we chastise true-blue sluts for wearing year-round.

8. Women like to trash talk about the "dark alley" scenario. We brag about how we would stab the attacker in the eye with our pointy finger, and how we would shove his nose into his brain with an upward palm thrust, and how we would bring him down with a fatal Tae Bo kick to the crotch, and how he would stand still while we did all that.

9. At their core, women believe the world is good. It is this fundamental optimism that keeps us applying sunscreen, venturing onto the dance floor with you, braving dark alleys, and, most important, that enables us to procreate and not be tempted to eat our offspring like the notoriously pessimistic hamster. (But, like the hamster, we do enjoy biting your head off every now and then.)

10. We aren't lying or being coy: We really don't have any stories about accidentally ****ting our pants. Sorry. Maybe we could connect on some other level.

www.eaquire.com

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  #29  
Old 03/03/2004, 8:19 PM
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Man Stands Behind Views on Fox’s Mad TV

METAIRIE, Louisiana- Despite increased options from cable and satellite providers, twenty-eight year-old Louisianan Jacob Sblendorio stands by a proclamation he made in 1999 that “Watching Mad TV on Fox is the single best thing that you can do on a Saturday night. Period.”

When asked if the resurgence of NBC’s Saturday Night Live even had him tempted to watch their show instead, he dismissed the idea as ridiculous. “Come on. Everybody knows that ‘SNL’ hasn’t been funny since 1988. I mean, sure I used to watch it, but that’s because Fox didn’t have a viable fresh and edgy alternative of its own. Besides, with SNL, you always knew that its best days were well behind you, and with ‘Mad’ I was able to get in on the ground floor. I was there from the beginning.”

“I absolutely like the new cast. While you’ll never really be able to re-create the magic of those first ground-breaking years from 1995 through 1997, I sincerely believe that stand-out talent like Ike Barinholtz, Stephnie Weir and Paul Vogt are well on their way to capturing America’s hearts the same way that original cast members Craig Anton, Mary Scheer and Bryan Callen did when the show started.”

Apparently unfazed by the fact that he has been old enough to drink during most of the series run, Sbelndorio proclaims himself to have a date with his TV every night. “Look, I like women as much as the next guy. Probably a little more. Maybe even too much more, but those records have been sealed due to the fact that I was a juvenile at the time. I go out with a lot of women. They just need to understand that I’m theirs the other six nights of the week. But, just like how they would want me to remain faithful to them, I really feel like its important to stay true to the show that has brought so much joy into my heart. Being able to turn to ‘Mrs. Swan’ and ‘Stuart’ helped me through some really tough times.”

After being told about Sblendorio’s dedication to the show he helped launch, former cast member Artie Lang stated, via cell phone from Las Vegas: “Wait a minute. You’re telling me that there is a show based on Mad Magazine… and I used to be on it? Go to hell, buddy, I think I’d remember.”

--- Christian Bladt

Source: http://www.insidejoke.tv/200401/newsbriefs.asp

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  #30  
Old 03/03/2004, 9:33 PM
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She has approached an ex colleague of hers, Robert Mello, to produce her one woman show.

Robert Mello Biography

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  #31  
Old 03/04/2004, 3:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jim_Cockhurtz


10 Things You Don't Know About Women

By Stephnie Weir
October 2002, Volume 138, Issue 4
Photograph by Jeff Lipsky


1. Women lust after younger men the same way men lust after younger women. But we don't marry them and let them take all our money.

2. Not all women love to shop. Regardless, we all hate "Shop-a-holic" novelty gifts—T-shirts, memo pads, refrigerator magnets—depicting a crazy-eyed woman engulfed in shopping bags and holding a smoking credit card. (We do, however, get a kick out of refrigerator magnets that say things like HEY, FAT ASS, THE LOVE YOU CRAVE AIN'T IN HERE!)

3. Fast dancing with you is like watching a stray dog trot down the interstate. We pray for a miracle but know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that a horrific tragedy is about to occur. That is why we prefer fast dancing with our lady friends. It has nothing to do with us having secret lesbian desires.

4. One of our greatest irrational fears is that one day, and thousands of dollars in lotions later, we'll find out that Granny from The Beverly Hillbillies religiously used sunscreen all her life.

5. The "psycho ex-girlfriends" from generations past are today referred to as "Mom."

6. Pro-choice women feel a tiny bit bad that you have no voice in the fate of your unborn child. The same way you feel a tiny bit bad that we make only seventy cents for every dollar you earn. Yeah, we plan to do nothing about it, either.

7. Women have only one Halloween costume. It is a slut. You may be thinking, Wait, I've seen women dressed as sexy witches, sexy cats, sexy hoboes. . . . But I assure you they were all dressed as sluts dressed as witches, cats, and hoboes. For us, Halloween is solely an opportunity to wear the whorish clothes we chastise true-blue sluts for wearing year-round.

8. Women like to trash talk about the "dark alley" scenario. We brag about how we would stab the attacker in the eye with our pointy finger, and how we would shove his nose into his brain with an upward palm thrust, and how we would bring him down with a fatal Tae Bo kick to the crotch, and how he would stand still while we did all that.

9. At their core, women believe the world is good. It is this fundamental optimism that keeps us applying sunscreen, venturing onto the dance floor with you, braving dark alleys, and, most important, that enables us to procreate and not be tempted to eat our offspring like the notoriously pessimistic hamster. (But, like the hamster, we do enjoy biting your head off every now and then.)

10. We aren't lying or being coy: We really don't have any stories about accidentally ****ting our pants. Sorry. Maybe we could connect on some other level.

www.eaquire.com

Holy **** Dude, that is some seriously ****ing hilarious **** man!!!!!!!!!!!

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  #32  
Old 03/04/2004, 4:17 PM
madtvlover Female madtvlover is offline
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LOL...Stephnie is soooooo funny!!
She looks very pretty in that pic!!

Last edited by madtvlover; 03/06/2004 at 11:19 AM.
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  #33  
Old 03/05/2004, 1:55 AM
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She won female Improviser of the year at the 2002 CIF (Chicago Improv Festival) Well deserved too! Interesting little facts here too: Ike and Josh debuted their show at CIF also, Colin Mocherie won Male performer of the year, Stephnie's all female show played at the festival

Quote:
Jane
A reunion show of the first nationally significant all-female improv ensemble, featuring CIF Female Improviser Of The Year award winner Stephnie Weir (MAD-TV).
The original members of Jane that will be appearing are Tami Sagher, Abby Schachner Molly Cavanaugh, Monica Payne, Bina Martin and Stephanie Weir. They were the first all female team at Improv Olympic. They are unique and funny. Each incredibly talented woman could do a show by themselves, but together they are something to marvel at. This is their second appearance in the Chicago Improv Festival. Their first was five years ago. Jane is funny.
CIF MAINSTAGE - Thursday, April 4, 2002 @ 8:00pm
as well as WeirDass, the 2 person shoe Steph did with her hubby, Robert Dassie.

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  #34  
Old 03/05/2004, 11:01 AM
GoGo Yubari Male GoGo Yubari is offline
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Quote:
7. Women have only one Halloween costume. It is a slut. You may be thinking, Wait, I've seen women dressed as sexy witches, sexy cats, sexy hoboes. . . . But I assure you they were all dressed as sluts dressed as witches, cats, and hoboes. For us, Halloween is solely an opportunity to wear the whorish clothes we chastise true-blue sluts for wearing year-round.
Classic.

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  #35  
Old 03/05/2004, 3:13 PM
madtvlover Female madtvlover is offline
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Default Steph's husband, Robert Dassie!!

Not that it matters or anything, but I was just curious as to what nationality Steph's husband, Robert, is. Anyone know?? To me, he looks Spanish but then again I could be wrong.
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  #36  
Old 03/06/2004, 4:16 PM
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Here's a article that reviews WeirDass. I found it at the same place I found all the Mo articles.........This one is from a few years ago. Enjoy!



Review Weirdass.


The Scotsman (Edinburgh, Scotland); 8/13/2001



Byline: Kate Copstick

Rocket @ South Bridge Resource Centre (venue 123)

IF THIS strange, compelling little two-hander is for real, it is impressive. If it is faked, it is impressive faking.

The show is one of three by Baby Wants Candy, one of Chicago's plethora of improv groups. Stephnie Weir and Robert Dassie are straight from that clear-eyed, scary-toothed mould from which so many American improv performers come.

This is long-form improv - which basically means more story, fewer jokes. In fact, their story - give or take a few detours along the way - lasts 45 minutes. And I have to say I wasn't bored for even one of them.

The whole show is improvised, they tell us, from one single word or thought given to them by one of us. A woman in the second row says "aborigine" in a tone that brooks no opposition.

So, aborigine it is. But not for long. The two play an extended game of what looks to be "character association" and weave a tenuous thread through the show. No more aborigines. But some wonderful creations, ingenious relationships and unexpected twists. I'd go again just to see how different it is.

Until 18 August

COPYRIGHT 2001 Scotsman Publications Ltd.

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  #37  
Old 03/06/2004, 4:21 PM
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Another article, Kinda long so I apologize, has Stephnie listed as one of the 10 up and coming comics to watch.

10 comics to watch: collection of talented, promising artists is nothing to laugh at ... well, maybe it is. (Spotlight).


Variety; 7/15/2002; Levine, Stuart



Funny business

With no box office barometer or Nielsen numbers to go by, Daily Variety selected 10 Comics to Watch by utilizing something much more personal: our collective guts.

This compilation of standups, sketch artists and a screenwriter covers the comedy playing field, with each rising to a level that should have audiences taking notice sooner rather than later.

For example, David Dorfman has penned the upcoming release "Anger Management," Stephnie Weir's sketch work on "Mad TV" is gathering attention and Bob Marley's standup act has never been stronger.

It's an inexact science in prognosticating who the next Jerry Seinfeld, Margaret Cho or Will Ferrell may be, but there could be worse assignments than hitting up comedy clubs and watching countless tapes trying to find out.

THE 10

Dane Cook David Dorfman Jeff Garcia Bob Marley Ruth Otero Tracy Smith Doug Stanhope Wanda Sykes Stephanie Weir Susan Yeagley

Dane Cook

Call him `Crouching Comedian, Hidden Punchline'

Boston-born Dane Cook's standup technique, much like a martial artist's discipline, has improved with age. Cook has shed the suit he wore for multiple appearances on David Letterman and Craig Kilborn's latenight shows over his 12-year career, and has altered his practice of rattling off rapid-fire one-liners.

These days, Cook's comedy costume is a Red Sox cap, tank top and a Cheshire-cat smile across his man-child Mark Walhbergesque face. It's all a further extension of his material of wild tales and innocent observances that can be heard on the recent CD "Harmful If Swallowed."

Cook's rebirth comes as result of digging back to his roots of improvisational antics with Beantown's A1 and the Monkeys, and bringing that urgency to his regular act at L.A.'s Laugh Factory.

"I want someone who sees me over the course of a week to get a different act every night" is how Cook explains his performance philosophy. "Once I use something too much it's out of the act. If you want to hear it again, go listen to it on my CD."

Touching on subjects like board games, evil Speak N Spells, growing up with all sisters and rubbernecking, it's no wonder he's gained a fervent college crowd following.

Cook's popularity has landed him on the tube with Comedy Central's new skein "Crank Yankers." He's also in talks to be the first comedian signed to the net's record label.

Another leap Cook never thought he'd make was the one from comic actor to chopsocky stud.

"One morning I was sitting in front of the TV playing videogames and the next morning I was on a plane to go kick some butt," he says of being a comic-relief bad guy in the Peter Pau-helmed Michelle Yeoh vehicle "The Touch"--which will hit Stateside through Miramax. "Now I'm back in front of the TV playing videogames, but it was an unreal experience I'll never forget." --Greg Reifsteck

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh?: "Anyone being attacked in a zoo setting, too close to a cage taking a photo, and after the picture the woman tries to pat a tiger. Goodbye! An arm for the photo? Classic comedy right there."

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?: "Ten Academy Awards, eight Emmy Awards, five Source Awards, three Nickelodeon Whatevers and one Pulitzer Prize. And, if that doesn't work out, I see myself writing in my journal eating a Fudgesicle."

What's more important: talent or connections? "Making the right connections in itself takes talent. I want to continue to surround myself with people that push forward."

David Dorfman

Screenwriter brings `Anger' to new levels

Screenwriter David Dorfman's expertise is taking an Average Joe and pushing him to the edge of chaos.

"Dorfman has a very unique sense of the world," says Revolution Studios partner Todd Garner. Revolution commissioned Dorfman to pen "Anger Management," a 2003 summer comedy vehicle for Adam Sandler and Jack Nicholson.

"He can take an average situation and put a great spin on it," Garner adds.

Dorfman's scripts concentrate on the straight, single man; someone who yearns for the girl yet is mauled by a world of misfits that prevents him from scoring.

In Dorfman's first spec script, "The Guest," which sold to New Line for $500,000, a twentysomething guy house-sits for his psycho boss so that he can get comfy with his sexpot daughter.

In "Anger Management," Dave (Sandler) is falsely accused of being an ill-tempered individual and assigned to anger therapy sessions with Buddy (Nicholson), a therapist trying to score with Dave's girlfriend (Marisa Tomei).

Unlike other comedic artists that douse their material with fodder from acerbic life experiences, Dorfman--a Bronx native and NYU film grad--works off the top of his head. Hardly any of his scripted scenarios are inspired from real life.

A man who praises Stanley Kubrick's "A Clockwork Orange" as an excellent black comedy," Dorfman says, "I love creating dark situations where one guy is turning another guy's life into a living hell."--Anthony D'Alessandro

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh?: "Photos of me having sex with my friend's wives."

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?: "Finishing up my five-year sentence working as a male model."

What's more important: talent or connections? "In the short run, connections, so that you can break in. However, talent is what's going to keep you afloat in the long run."

Jeff Garcia

Voiceover work keeps standup on the move

A cockroach climbed onstage as Jeff Garcia bantered with the audience during a Southern California show last month but the comic wasn't about to be upstaged.

"I didn't tell you guys I'm a ventriloquist, too," he said, holding the microphone to the roach and saying in a squeaky voice, "Ehh ... hello ... where's the kitchen?"

The ability to think on his feet and roll with the punches has gotten the 26-year-old plenty of attention. Never one to deliver a canned routine, he trades jabs with the crowd and provides laughs with fresh, timely material.

"I work a lot at the same spots so I can't say the same things because the same people show up," he says. "People that do the same sets over and over (won't) be able to interact if anything else happens."

Knowing at an early age that he wanted to be a standup, Garcia auditioned for an open-mike night at 13 but was rejected for being too young. Undeterred, he later called back with a disguised voice and came in second at an amateur contest in Montclair, Calif.

Garcia does voiceover work for Nickelodeon's "Jimmy Neutron" cartoon franchise, including the Oscar-nominated film and its upcoming sequel. Staying under the Viacom umbrella, he's working on MTV's upcoming animated skein "Clone High."

His comic nature runs in the family.

"My grandma is the biggest goofball," he says. "Picture someone like me but an old lady."--Nancy Gondo

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh?: "Don Rickles makes me laugh my ass off. He's just a nut."

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?: "Doing another Variety interview."

What's more important: talent or connections? "Both. The last eight years have been about talent for me but recently, it's been about trying to get something going on as far as TV goes."

Ruth Otero

`Dancing' thesp bares her demons in one-woman show

Contrary to the thesp axiom that drama is easy and comedy is hard, Ruth Otero uses humor as a catharsis. The very issues that might cause arrested development in even the most self aware, Otero faces head on, with the audience as her mirror. If there was a "Fear Factor" for actors, Otero would thrive as MC.

In "Losing My Religion," her first one-woman show at New York's Third Eye Repertory, the writer-performer confronted her upbringing as a Seventh-day Adventist. In the more ambitious "Dancing With My Demons," which just closed its run at Hollywood's Theater Theater, Otero broadens the spectrum of neuroses: from conflicts stemming from concealing, then embracing, her Puerto Rican roots to fears related to motherhood, sexuality and her insecurities as an entertainer.

"Laughing and crying are very similar, very cathartic," says Otero. "When you cry from sorrow you feel so alone. When you cry from laughing, you don't feel like you're the only one."

A graduate of NYU's Tisch School of the Arts who has exhibited a knack for improv with the SalSoul Comedy Troupe and as a founding member of Hoffenrich, Otero has punched her own ticket. She's been writing monologues for the last 10 years, including a sketch gig with Caroline's Comedy Club.

Her recent move to L.A. from the north Bronx, where she grew up in a predominantly Italian neighborhood, was a calculated effort to advance her career. And the effort has paid off with notices from HBO, and network execs who've taken a keen interest in her next move.

"It's nice to be out here and be surrounded by creativity in a new environment," she says. "New York is hustle, hustle, hustle and very manic. Here I can just breathe. OK, there's another pace to live on."--Steve Chagollan

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh?: "The element of surprise; when somebody does something that's revealing about themselves, whether they mean to or not."

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?: "I see myself having a home in Italy and in New York, still writing and performing."

What's more important: talent or connections? "Jesus Christ, connections."

Bob Marley

Life's little things bring best out of club fave

Bob Marley went to his mailbox a few years back and was astonished to find a check written to him for $6,000.

He'd done some acting and was told there might be residuals but this seemed awfully high. Upon calling the American Federation of Radio & Radio Artists to inquire, the woman told him it was for his performance in "The History of Rock `n' Roll."

Comedian Marley is neither Jamaican nor does he sing reggae, but the funnyman still has an extremely loyal audience. After fine-tuning a career that began in his home state of Maine, Marley's talking to CBS, HBO and Fox about possible sitcom deals.

"When you first get to Hollywood, you get anxious but now I'm just in it to have a good time and do good work," he says.

Married for seven years, many of his riffs are based on the way men and women interact. He describes his act as "man's need to conserve energy and still walk away with a little dignity."

Simple, ordinary events--going to Home Depot, watching TV late at night--told in a PG-rated easygoing style have made Marley a comedy club knockout.

While in college, Marley used to regularly drive nearly five hours a night between his home state of Maine and Boston to play some of the bigger clubs in Beantown, all the while earning a 3.98 grade-point average at school.

That type of dedication to his craft has some TV execs believing Marley will soon be taking his act from the stage to the small screen.

"The real challenge is to find a showrunner that plays to your strength," Marley explains. "It has to be about what the audience has seen in the club. It's a challenge but I'm up for it."--Stuart Levine

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh?: "The other comedians when they're offstage, That's when it's no-holds barred and everyone giving each other a hard time."

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?: "No matter what happens, I'll still be doing standup."

What's more important: talent or connections? "Talent. It's not about materialistic goods or getting what you deserve. If you just have connections, you don't enjoy yourself as a performer."

Tracy Smith

Audience relates to banter on sex, singlehood

Comic Tracy Smith is no stranger to being in the limelight. Growing up in a family with nine kids, she had to fight for attention.

"I liked to read my papers aloud in class and I was a figure skater, so I definitely liked to perform," says Smith, who hails from Ontario, Canada.

Her career began at the Dulles Airport Holiday Inn 13 years ago when she came up with 10 minutes of material in two days and won an open-mike contest.

Now she travels around the country delivering her spots, which focus on the lives and thoughts of single thirtysomething women--think of it as the candid humor of HBO's "Sex and the City" onstage.

"(The material) really comes from just sitting down and having coffee and drinks with girlfriends," she says. "It's really an elbows-up-to-the-bar type of rant that goes on."

Women often rethink their relationships after seeing Smith live--and thank her for giving them a reality check.

It's not just women who appreciate her performance, though, since a lot of her act stems from a male point of view. For instance, she tells women who want to meet someone to buy a guy a beer instead of waiting for him to approach.

"He knows it's going to cost him $10 just to say hello, and you're going to tell him to piss off," she says. "So be nicer. Give a guy a break."

Now what guy wouldn't agree with that?--Nancy Gondo

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh?: "My really dark humor stems from great pain."

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?: "Going to a syndication meeting in New York for my as of yet to be invented sitcom."

What's more important: talent or connections? "Talent, which will bring you the connections."

Doug Stanhope

Verbal barrage on social issues not for the easily offended

Doug Stanhope is a hard-core standup comic. His self-described "violent libertarianism" act takes no prisoners as it savages everything from vice cops and irresponsible parents to the elderly, oral sex and one-night stands.

Stanhope's racy act combines the politically charged humor of George Carlin and the raunchy hilarity of Andrew Dice Clay, whom Stanhope used to imitate for his telemarketing boss before an open-mike night lead him to comedy.

"I root for life the way most people root for sports," says the 35-year-old native of Worcester, Mass. "I have my beliefs and I don't think I'm changing anything ... but it's still good to pick your team and play."

Most important to Stanhope is saying what he wants in his own expressive style and having people listen--especially important in the post-Sept. 11 political climate. He says people who pay attention only to the crude language fail to get the point of the Story and he's glad it's younger crowds that can get past the language.

"If I put a lot of (expletives) into a good point, then kids are listening and that's who needs to listen," he says. "Otherwise, you can play San Francisco every week but you're preaching to the choir."

After 12 years of standup, Stanhope's Hollywood experience has been limited so far to "When Hidden Cameras Attack!," shot three years ago but just now airing Fridays on Fox, and a pilot for NBC titled "Comic House," which was "Big Brother" with standup comics.

Stanhope, who also posts essays and photos at www.dougstanhope.com, says more TV is tempting but he's not interested in muting his message.

"I'd love to do a TV show if they'd let me do what I'd like to do," he says. "I'm not in this for fame's sake."--Thomas J. McLean

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh?: "Tragedy ... I have no idea why. It's probably from years of watching pabulum comedy that you realize that like most everything else in life, it's bull**** at the end of the day. Doing this for a living, you realize that's really weak."

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?: "Ultimately, I'd like to be living so far away from everyone on a deserted island that I'd stop trying to change people's minds."

What's more important: talent or connections? "Talent is neither here nor there. Look at what's No. 1 on TV, look at what's No. 99."

Stephnie Weir

`Mad TV' performer does Dixie in style

Stephnie Weir doesn't purposely goof on Southern stereotypes, but, rather, looks into the soul of small-town eccentrics.

Like many of her fellow alumni from Chicago's ImprovOlympic, Weir locates a bit of truth in every impersonation.

"There is something very intuitive in her work. Her characters come out of someplace that she's channeling," says ImprovOlympic owner Charna Halpern, who worked with Weir in the mid-'90s.

Weir is a fixture on Fox's "Mad TV," where she recently finished her second season, and at the ImprovOlympic West in Hollywood, where she performs alongside husband Robert Dassie in "WeirDass."

Weir credits her parade of personalities to folks from her childhood in Texas.

In one skit she portrays the elderly Leona Campbell who dials up Jamaican psychic Miss Cleo and innocently questions her on why she didn't foresee the Sept. 11 attacks. Leona is a combo of two people: a woman Weir overheard on a long train trip and her grandmother, whose wry observations in life have influenced Weir's comedic being.

"My grandmother once salvaged an old cuckoo clock," says Web: "When I asked why, she responded, `If it was broken, I'd throw it away.' It was unusual advice, but I've always followed it: Use what you've got."--Anthony D'Alessandro

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh? "Honest scenarios. Those odd, truthful moments such as a baby stroller dragging a box of Cheerios. These hit my funny bone more than standup."

Where do you see yourself five years from now? "Writing and acting."

What's more important: talent or connections? "Talent and persistence. The marriage of those are the most optimistic approach."

Wanda Sykes

Happily situated between a Rock and burgeoning career

Just minutes before appearing in her 1998 standup special for Comedy Central, Wanda Sykes was left dumbfounded by the cabler's suits.

"They told me to watch my language," she recalls, incredulously. "And this is coming from a network whose top-rated cartoon has a talking piece of ****!"

Later on the TV special, she goes on to kill the audience with a story about how she had to do a charity standup gig for a feminist's group.

"What were they going to do if I said something that offended them? Pay me?," quips Sykes.

After performing at Caroline's in New York in 1996, Sykes' sassiness intrigued Chris Rock, who hired her as a writer for his HBO comedy skein.

Not only was she credited with some of Rock's funniest lines but it was there that she also developed as a sketch performer, often stealing scenes from her A-list co-star.

Like Rock, Sykes' comedic sensibilities cuts right through the b.s. of a situation. Sykes and her fellow "Chris Rock" scribes have been nominated four times for a variety-comedy show writing Emmy, and took one home in 1999.

Taking her act to the bigscreen, she appeared with Rock in "Down to Earth" and with Eddie Murphy in "The Nutty Professor 2: The Klumps."

Sykes is now taking her thespian talent to the broadcast nets as she begins shooting a pilot for Fox in August titled "Wanda at Large." The sitcom, which centers on a Washington comic who is also a TV anchor, is loosely based on Sykes and her lifelong friends.--Anthony D'Alessandro

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh?: Anybody falling down.

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?: Starting point guard for the Knicks

What's more important: talent or connections? Talent

Susan Yeagley

`Winwood' thesp has breakout potential

With several national commercials, guest appearances on primetime sitcoms and a Groundlings background, Susan Yeagley has all the ingredients of becoming a big-time comedy player.

Yeagley sees green in her future but not necessarily in the form of dollars. She's found true love in the shape of a putting green. "Golf is the only sport I can play where I don't get sweaty," says the Tennessee native.

Her availability for tee times may be limited if her career takes off. Currently starring in the title role in the satire "Beverly Winwood Presents the Actors Showcase," Yeagley has received the praise of many A-list thesps who have attended the Groundlings satire.

The play is doing so well that there's talk of moving it to the Canon Theater in Beverly Hills in August to accommodate a larger audience. Upon leaving the South, Yeagley attended USC with a major in film.

"When I graduated, Steven Spielberg handed me my diploma," Yeagley reminisces. "My mom yelled out, `Hug him!' but all I could do is say, `I really liked "E.T.," sir.'"

After school, she immediately began work for the Groundlings and landed a slew of guest roles on high-profile sitcoms including "Malcolm in the Middle," "The Ellen Show" and "Friends." Her most recent commercial, as a maniacal cycling instructor for Wheaties cereal, increased Yeagley's exposure dramatically.

That's a long way from Nashville, where she was given $25 and a record after appearing in an Amy Grant video.

So now the ultimate goal of becoming a comedy regular--either onstage, onscreen or in a sitcom--becomes ever so close. What could be more exciting than that? Replies Yeagley, "A hole in one."--Stuart Levine

UP CLOSE

What makes you laugh?: "Watching Garry Shandling."

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?: "Smiling on the golf course with a couple of movies in the can."

What's more important: talent or connections? "Talent. If you have that, you can always trust yourself and not rely on others."

COPYRIGHT 2002 Reed Business Information

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Old 03/06/2004, 4:30 PM
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'Schoolgirl Figure' gives the skinny on anorexia on anorexia obsessions.(Time Out!)


Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL); 4/14/2000



Wendy MacLeod is one of those playwrights who gets her work produced but who remains largely unknown, even in the theater world.

Even when she knocks one out of the park, as she did with "The House of Yes," which was made into a well-received independent movie starring Parker Posey (don't they all star Parker Posey?), she remains obscure.

Which is a shame because as she proves with her latest play, "Schoolgirl Figure" at the Goodman Theatre, she is becoming a powerful, comic writer, on the order of a Christopher Durang.

Like Durang, MacLeod pulls no punches. In "Schoolgirl Figure" she attacks with a vengeance the obsession with body image that drives so many adolescent girls to anorexia. In MacLeod's world, school girls not only aspire to being thin, they revel every time one of their friends is hospitalized or starves to death.

But also like Durang, MacLeod has a heart and at the center of her hilariously vicious send up of the diet culture MacLeod has genuine concern for her characters and for the many sad, confused and depressed girls they represent.

Set in a modern day high school, MacLeod's play creates a world where all school girls binge and purge. The play begins with a long line of girls waiting to gag themselves in the bathroom. And everyone in school wants to join an exclusive anorexics-only club. Monique, the current leader of the pack, is dying of her eating disorder and the battle is on between bony Renee and skinny Jeanine over who will be the new leader and win the right to date Monique's boyfriend, Bradley.

With an acid wit and a laser eye, MacLeod dissects this dysfunctional world, slashing at such sacred cows as Barbie, dieting, and the culturally inspired desire to lose a few extra pounds.

MacLeod's rail-thin protagonists literally don't have an extra ounce to lose, yet they continue trying to lose, celebrating when a bout of stomach flu makes them small enough to fit in a size 2.

MacLeod's play is expertly realized by David Patrarca, who fills his cast with bright young talents. Schuyler Grant is killing as the scheming Renee. And Second City ensemble member Stephnie Weir does a star turn or two as the dying Monique, Monique's mother and several others.

"Schoolgirl Figure" runs though April 30 at the Goodman Studio, 200 S. Columbus Drive, Chicago. For tickets and show times call (312) 443-3800.

COPYRIGHT 2000 Paddock Publications

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Old 03/13/2004, 2:49 PM
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I heard Stephanie had an audition for SNL but didnt make the cut in season 24 or 25

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Dennis Miller: I don't wanna go on a RANT here but America's foreign policy makes about as much sense as Beowolf having sex with Robert Fulton at the first Battle of Antetum. I mean when a neo-conservative defenstrates it's like Raskalnakov filibuster dioxymonohydrostinate.
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Old 03/13/2004, 3:03 PM
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But then they hired dratch the next year

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Dennis Miller: I don't wanna go on a RANT here but America's foreign policy makes about as much sense as Beowolf having sex with Robert Fulton at the first Battle of Antetum. I mean when a neo-conservative defenstrates it's like Raskalnakov filibuster dioxymonohydrostinate.
Peter: What the hell does RANT mean?
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